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Trade Structure

According to data from Bank of Lithuania, Lithuania’s exports of goods and services in 2011 amounted to EUR 23.9 billion (USD 33.3 billion), while imports of goods and services had a value of EUR 24.3 billion (USD 33.9 billion). Compared to 2010, exports of goods and services rose with 27.5 percent. Imports of goods and services increased with 27.6 percent. In 2011 the foreign trade deficit of Lithuania amounted to EUR 396.5 million (USD 549.8 million), which was an increase of 33.7 percent compared to the previous year. With a value of EUR 20.2 billion merchandise exports (f.o.b.) had a share of 84.3 percent in total exports of goods and services, while exports of services had a share of 15.7 percent. Merchandise imports (f.o.b.) had a share of 82.9 percent in total imports of goods and services; imports of services had a share of 17.1 percent.

Lithuania's Export, EUR billion
Lithuania's Import, EUR billion

Merchandise trade

Based on non-final data from Statistics Lithuania, total merchandise exports (f.o.b.) amounted to EUR 20.2 billion (USD 28.1 billion) in 2011, which was an increase of 28.9 percent compared to 2010. Excluding mineral fuels, merchandise exports grew with 25.6 percent. With an amount of EUR 13.3 billion (USD 18.5 billion) domestically produced exports had a share of 65.9 percent in total merchandise exports. Re-exports amounted to EUR 6.9 billion (USD 9.6 billion), which constituted 34.1 percent of total merchandise exports.

Measured by total merchandise exports, Lithuania’s most important trade partners in 2011 were Russia with 16.6 percent, followed by Latvia with 10.2 percent, Germany with 9.3 percent, Poland with 7.0 percent and Estonia with 6.6 percent. 61.4 percent of total merchandise exports went to EU countries, followed by CIS countries with 27.7 percent and EFTA countries with 2.3 percent. Taking only domestically produced merchandise exports into account excluding mineral fuels, then the most important trade partners were Germany with 16.5 percent, followed by Sweden with 7.7 percent, Russia with 7.3 percent, Poland with 6.8 percent and Latvia with 6.6 percent. Without mineral fuels, domestically produced merchandise was mostly exported to EU countries with a share of 73.3 percent, followed by CIS countries with 10.6 percent and EFTA countries with 5.0 percent.

Structure of domestically produced exports (excl. mineral fuels) by category in 2011, %

Structure of merchandise imports (excl. mineral fuels) classified by CN in 2011, %

Measured by total merchandise exports, Lithuania’s most important exported categories classified by the Combined Nomenclature (CN) were mineral fuels with a share of 25.3 in total, followed by transport means with 7.2 percent, machinery and mechanical appliances with 6.1 percent, plastics and articles of plastic with 5.8 percent and furniture with 5.1 percent. Taking only domestically produced merchandise exports into account excluding mineral fuels, then the most important exported categories were plastics and articles of plastic with a share of 11.1 percent in total, followed by fertilizers with 10.9 percent, furniture with 10.7 percent, wood and articles of wood with 6.7 percent and dairy products with 5.5 percent.

Structure of domestically produced exports (excl. mineral fuels) by category in 2011, %

Structure of merchandise imports (excl. mineral fuels) by country in 2011, %

Based on preliminary data from Statistics Lithuania, total merchandise imports (c.i.f.) amounted to EUR 22.6 billion (USD 31.5 billion) in 2011, which was an increase of 28.2 percent compared to 2010. Excluding mineral fuels, merchandise imports grew with 25.1 percent. Measured by total merchandise imports, Lithuania’s most important trade partners in 2011 were Russia with 32.8 percent, followed by Germany with 9.7 percent, Poland with 9.1 percent, Latvia with 6.6 percent and Netherlands with 4.9 percent. 55.9 percent of total merchandise imports came from EU countries, followed by CIS countries with 36.6 percent and EFTA countries with 0.8 percent. Excluding mineral fuels, Lithuania imported most from Germany with a share of 14.6 percent, followed by Poland with 12.6 percent, Latvia with 9.0 percent, Netherlands with 7.4 percent and Sweden with 4.8 percent. Excluding mineral fuels, Lithuania imported most from EU countries with 80.9 percent of total, from CIS countries with 8.4 percent and EFTA with 1.1 percent.